The canned laugh track on this Ted entry is indeed awesome.

HollyGawds: Don’t even start. That’s an ALL ORIGINAL comedic sketch parody of record-ratings-getting-live-performance of Universal NBC’s “The Sound of Music” starring Grammy winning national treasure Carrie Underwood!

This parody of that national treasure, stars national treasure Kristen Wiig, accompanied by myriad A-list professional comedians from NBC Universals hit national treasure, “Saturday Night Live.”

It was written by an entire staff of experienced and treasured writers, performed live in America’s very own New York City, with a beautiful ensemble, featuring the music from Tony and Academy award winning national treasure, “The Sound of Music.” And it was licensed and financed by a major television network, of course.

Me: I mean right? It’s a shot-by-shot remake, of a major studio-produced and financed national treasure, and it’s baller genius.

HollyGawds: No Michael that’s DEFINITELY Fan Fiction.

Me: What!!!?

HollyGawds: Yes, Hollywood was not involved in the making of this, and so therefore it’s definitely just your average run of the mill slough. A toss away comic con watercooler conversation at best.

Me: Are you kidding me? This movie is incredible! It has everything! The kids did their own actual stunts, and they worked on the movie for 7 years in their spare time and using their own money!!!!! Surely that’s -


HollyGawds: No  Michael. No network or studio involvement. It’s uninventive plagiarism at best.

Me: But didn’t we all just hail Richard Linklater as an original genius for filming a coming of age movie with the same cast for over 12 years?

HollyGawds: Yes Michael, but that’s completely different. That’s a  -

HollyGawds and Michael together: major motion picture studio financed national treasure.

HollyGawds; Now you understand.

Me: Clearly.

Me: Fan fiction?

HollyGawds: No, Michael, this is a response to the white middle class male ages 18 - 40 fan base wanting to see a crossover episode of a major network’s two genius cultural icon and national treasures, The Simpsons, and Family Guy. Not only did writers, actors, and producers from both shows get paid, this idea to use characters from unrelated franchises was so fresh and original, that Hollywood had to come up with a new name, just to commemorate its ingeniousness. We’re calling it a Mashable! The Mashable itself is certain to become a national treasure.

Me: Neat!

Me: THIS ONE is DEFINITELY fan fiction, no?
HollyGawds: No, Michael, that is a mass produced original graphic novel featuring blockbuster crossover characters from major motion picture studio financed franchises. Several writers (shown on the cover) worked over the course of months to inspire a fleet of paid artists to bring this totally original work to life. That is DEFINITELY not fan fiction.
Me: (Scratches head) oh.

Me: THIS ONE is DEFINITELY fan fiction, no?

HollyGawds: No, Michael, that is a mass produced original graphic novel featuring blockbuster crossover characters from major motion picture studio financed franchises. Several writers (shown on the cover) worked over the course of months to inspire a fleet of paid artists to bring this totally original work to life. That is DEFINITELY not fan fiction.

Me: (Scratches head) oh.

Me: Fan fiction?
HollyGawds: No, Michael, that’s Tina Fey, actor extraordinaire and national treasure. Here she’s starring, executive producing, and getting paid as a writer to interpret her original character “Liz Lemon” in Universal NBC’s hit syndicated situation comedy, “30 Rock.” This particular scene shows Liz in a character homage dressed as another of our major motion picture studio financed national treasures, Princess Leia from AFI top 100 film entry Star Wars, Episode 4, A New Hope. We had to bring in extra hair and make up people just for this gag because the buns kept unraveling under our very hot and very expensive lighting package. I remember a whole flock of writers worked together and over a period of 3 days JUST to get this beat right. And boy did they ever! I mean it’s Tina Fey as Liz Lemon as Princess Leia! Genius! That gag is just REALLY fresh and funny.
Me: I agree! But why is it funnier than comic con players cos playing and creating their own Star Wars based 30 Rock fan fiction?
HollyGawds: Because Tina Fey is a professional movie star that makes millions of dollars for the major motion picture studios and is financed by a major motion picture studio. National treasure. 
Me: oh.

Me: Fan fiction?

HollyGawds: No, Michael, that’s Tina Fey, actor extraordinaire and national treasure. Here she’s starring, executive producing, and getting paid as a writer to interpret her original character “Liz Lemon” in Universal NBC’s hit syndicated situation comedy, “30 Rock.” This particular scene shows Liz in a character homage dressed as another of our major motion picture studio financed national treasures, Princess Leia from AFI top 100 film entry Star Wars, Episode 4, A New Hope. We had to bring in extra hair and make up people just for this gag because the buns kept unraveling under our very hot and very expensive lighting package. I remember a whole flock of writers worked together and over a period of 3 days JUST to get this beat right. And boy did they ever! I mean it’s Tina Fey as Liz Lemon as Princess Leia! Genius! That gag is just REALLY fresh and funny.

Me: I agree! But why is it funnier than comic con players cos playing and creating their own Star Wars based 30 Rock fan fiction?

HollyGawds: Because Tina Fey is a professional movie star that makes millions of dollars for the major motion picture studios and is financed by a major motion picture studio. National treasure.

Me: oh.

Me: Fan Fiction?

HollyGawds: No, Michael, that’s a major motion picture studio financed feature remake of another major motion picture studio financed national treasure. That’s not Fan Fiction.

Me: Oh. Because on the surface it just seems like some people were really big fans of the original Psycho and decided to remake it -

HollyGawds: No Michael, that’s not the same.

More on the whole Fan Fiction Hollywood Elitist BS

I personally do not fancy myself a writer. It’s not anything I really tried to pursue professionally, but over the years, I did find myself in many positions, including a staff position at a Motion Media company, where writing was at least part of my job.

While I was living in LA, I met several professional writers, and even more aspiring writers. And there’s no mystery to how each of those writers got their jobs, they wrote/write the equivalent of “fan fiction” for the show they’re applying for. All writers do this. Even the seasoned/successful writers, must send in what’s known as “spec scripts” to the shows they’re applying for.

A friend of mine was a full time writer for Law and Order: SVU. When the show ended, had to go find a new job. How did he do that? He submitted scripts to the shows he wanted to get on their writing staff. In otherwords he wrote fan fiction.

A person I used to work for was not working as a professional writer, but wanted to. And he spent his free time writing “spec scripts” (aka Fan Fiction) for the shows he wanted to write for - I remember one of his specs for My Name is Earl was particularly good.

So what’s a spec? Here’s the wiki definition:

A spec script, also known as a speculative screenplay, is a non-commissioned unsolicited screenplay. It is usually written by a screenwriter who hopes to have the script optioned and eventually purchased by a producer, production company, or studio.

Spec scripts which have gone on to win Academy Awards include: Thelma & Louise (sold by Callie Khouri to Ridley Scott’s production company for $500,000 in 1990); Good Will Hunting (sold by Matt Damon and Ben Affleck to Castle Rock Entertainment for $675,000 in 1994); and American Beauty (sold by Alan Ball to DreamWorks Studios for $250,000 in 1998).[1]

So essentially, all writers are writing Fan Fiction, unless they’re writing an original work.

This is a perfect example of my myriad beefs with the “if you’re not a part of our special little clique” mentality of LA that I have - if someone writes a script that ISN’T already a professional union writer, it’s instantly dubbed “fan fiction”.

Or say for instance someone dresses their own sets for their own personal projects; that gets dubbed “table scaping” vs. what the Academy calls “Set Decoration.”

What’s the difference? There isn’t any. Just egos at play. To quote Yoda, “There’s no difference. Only different in your mind.”

Are you starting to see why I didn’t work out in LA? I just don’t have the ego for it. And I’m OK with that. I have let the shit out of it go. I’m just waiting for the rest of the world to realize what they’ve done and catch up to me.

Oh and those professional “writers” whose job it is to go into people’s personal lives and make fun of them for it, they get to call themselves “comedic impersonators.” But it looks like old fashioned grade-A bullying to me.